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4

SC’s Competitive

EDGE:

Advanced Manufacturing

“Take a chance on our youth and see how it

can make you and your business better.”

— TY TAYLOR, PRESIDENT OF GREENFIELD INDUSTRIES, INC.

About Greenfield

Industries

Greenfield Industries,

Inc. manufactures and

sells branded and private

label cutting tools to the

industrial and consumer

markets in North America.

It is owned by TDC Cutting

Tools, the world’s larg-

est manufacturer of high

speed steel cutting tools.

Greenfield employs over

320 at the Seneca site,

where it produces HSS

industrial drill bits, taps,

dies and carbide end mills.

TDC has manufacturing

and/or sales locations in

Asia, Africa, Europe, North

and South America.

Greenfield and its

predecessors pioneered

the cutting tool industry

in the U.S. in 1834. Brands

owned by Greenfield such

as Cleveland, Chicago-

Latrobe, Cle-Line,

Greenfield Threading and

Bassett are household

names in the cutting

tool industry with a long

history and tradition of

quality.

respective apprenticeship programs.

But the most prized component of

apprenticeship is the creation of a

trained workforce.

Susan Miller, leader of the

Greenfield Apprentice Program,

says, “The tax credit and SCAI grant

are excellent incentives, but the

most beneficial outcome is the

development of the student. We

gain a productive employee as they

progress in their skills.”

Miller says that Greenfield’s part-

nership with Tri-County Tech and

Oconee County’s Hamilton Ca-

reer Center is key to training the

students. “They are preparing the

students for jobs in our plant. The

students have a basic foundation

when they leave the career center.

Our apprenticeship coordinator

works closely with the instructor

at Hamilton Career Center on the

selection and development of the

students.”

Ty Taylor believes that appren-

ticeship is invaluable to both the

student and company. “The youth

apprenticeship program creates

a win-win situation. It brings the

student and the company experi-

ence that lets each develop and

grow personally and professionally,

hopefully giving a young person

the experience to have a career in

manufacturing. The student,

Greenfield and community all win

with this program.”

For other companies considering

youth apprenticeship, Taylor says,

“Take a chance on our youth and

see how it can make you and your

business better.” He also adds that

he appreciates South Carolina’s

investment in apprenticeship. “I

would encourage the state to con-

tinue to support this program and

reward the students and companies

that participate.”